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CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 2:00pm EST
workable. i remind my republican colleagues that the affordable care act is the law and has been the law of the land for four years. and it was upheld by the supreme court. as democrats have predicted for months, enrollment in the affordable care act exchanges is picking up speed as we approach the new year. as americans learn more about the benefits of this law, more and more of them are logging on to shop for affordable quality insurance through the state and national exchanges. the rollout of the national affordable care act was rocky, to say the least, when it came out. congress had to make crucial improvements to other landmark programs such as social security and medicare when they were first enacted as well. these big legislative deals can have some wrinkles in them. it doesn't mean social security is bad. it doesn't mean that medicare is bad. it means they're hard to get started, and it's just the same as obamacare. but now i repeat, mr. president, many of the major problems with the health care law have been fixed hundreds of thousands of americans are logging on every day to re
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
up. it is plagued with huge security risks and we are left with no choice. this law has to be repealed, replaced and like they did when they were selling the disastrous low to the american people, democrat democrats are lying again to save the law. they say republicans have no solutions. the republicans do have an alternative plan. it could save $2 trillion over ten years. we want you to join the conversation. log onto our facebook page. reince priebus is with us. >> thank you for having me on. you rattled off a bunch of problems just to name a few. >> just to name a few. but the president challenged republicans. i think this was a chase the rabbit trying to divert attention scheme like the class warfare speech yesterday and trying to talk about aids the day before. tom price has a specific plan. it wouldn't be my plan but it's better than what we've got. there is a plan on the table. >> look, you led into this a little bit talking about young people. what the obama care package is was intentionally designed to screw over young people. was it a mistake? it wasn't an acci
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
with the president's new effort to save his health care law. pl plus, what's the new push to defend the president from this now infamous broken promise. >> if you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor. you can keep your plan. >> and breaking developments in the rape case against a star quarterback heisman trophy contender. >> unfortunately sometimes one-night stands happen. >> and this marine may have saved a half dozen lives when he fell on a grenade. why doesn't the military want to give him a medal? we'll try to get through the hour together. bear with me. this is getting uglier by the moment. there is a lot of news. we'll get you through it. just breaking, the president making new comments on the problems for the health care law including whether anyone will be held accountable for failures thus far. first there is new reaction to the death of former south african president nelson mandela. he died peacefully at 95. over the last few hours everyone from the pope to our living presidents have reacted. he was born the son of a tribal chief later rising through the ranks of the anti-aparthei
LINKTV
Dec 9, 2013 5:30am PST
several dead and hundreds injured. the vote to thai law, will have to be held within 60 days. >> were the first time in four decades, singapore has been hit with riots. the unrest started after a bus hit and killed a foreign worker in the neighborhood known as little india. over two dozen people have been taken into police custody. >> dozens of people turning over police cars and attacking ambulances in singapore. no one has seen this in more than 40 years. in their homes, singaporeans watched in disbelief. time inis the first my life i have seen this. >> it started when a private bus hit and killed a foreign worker. hundreds of workers rushed to the scene, throwing objects at the bus and rescue workers, setting ablaze ambulances and police cars. authorities are asking singaporeans to share any information they have on incident. >> we take this incident very seriously. effort to resto -- arrest those who were involved. >> singaporeans debated on why the riots started. some called for tough sanctions. singapore has harsh anti-writing -- anti-rioting laws. those arrested could face up t
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
plus success equals one massive right wing freakout. president obama's health care law is working. and many on the right just can't handle it. here's what i'm talking about. >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great injustice and was willing to pay a huge price for that. that's the reason he's mourned today because of that struggle he performed. but you're right. what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obama care is front and center in that. >> yes. he just compared fighting the health care law to fighting apartheid. rick santorum doesn't have to like the health care law, but he's a former u.s. senator. does he really think it compares to government-backed racial segregation. but this is the ugliest we've seen from comparing the law that saves lives to hurricane katrina to saying the law was terrorizing the
FOX News
Dec 8, 2013 10:00am PST
to solving the low enrollment and lack of enthusiasm around the law. >> not enough pr, that is what we're hearing this morning. i'll let you respond to that. also, as part of the polling, this comes from united technologies congressional connection poll. about -- actually, more than half of these young people, 18 to 29 who were surveyed said, they actually think the law is going to get repealed. whether that's reality or not, it's the perception. if they think that after three-plus years of what most of us would argue there's been pr, how in the world do you convince them at this point to sign up? >> absolutely, shannon. i think what this really shows is millenials are a whole lot smarter than president obama thinks they are. they have looked at the choices and, as this poll shows, they are not really interested. he catapulted to his presidency by taking this group of people for granted and as much as i think young people want to see some sort of health care reform, they are not really interested in being forced to pay for something that doesn't really benefit them. >> richard, what do
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 6:00pm EST
of law, there will be mob justice. after days of killing, some people have had enough. they're out for revenge. nasane mushiri, bangui. >> coast to coast, a deadly combination, creating dangerous driving conditions across much of the country and over 1500 flights have been cancelled nationwide. al jazeera usher careshi with more. >> while the snow that fell most of the day in the area has stopped, i dot has given it the all clear, but the arctic temperatures continue. the high reaching the lower 20s was reached about 9:00 in the morning today and those temperatures are dropping. by about 7:30 this evening when the bears are playing the dallas cowboys the temperature will be about 16°. it will feel more like below zero at that time and chicagoans are going to have to continuing to bundle up. there have been arctic conditions as far south as texas, also incidents in minnesota when they got two feet of snow, pileups in wisconsin on sunday, 30 pileups between chicago and milwaukee, a result of those slick conditions. and these arctic temperatures are not expected to let up any time so
PBS
Dec 7, 2013 5:30am PST
welcome back. hands up for kelso parliament has approved the state secrets law by a vote of one hundred today too despite fierce protests from the and opposition parties against the bill. the long grass the government more authority to implement harsher penalties for those who leak sensitive secrets he won't force prison terms of up to two years for the leaking of sensitive information on issues ranging from defence diplomacy counterintelligence and counterterrorism. the lower house approved the bill last week. primus is as obvious as the law will protect national security and the suede u s concerns all the risk of hearing strategically sensitive information with toby a lot has met strong opposition from politicians and critics were the law could be used to cover a government abuses and to protect civil liberties. cctv correspondent nst machine that takes a look at how the japanese people are reacting to the debate and to the secrecy be . the japanese once again surrounded the diet building and the more mocking number fifty in protest against a state secret protection bill a bill that
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 4:00pm EST
. the fear is with no rule of law there will be mob justice. after days of killing some people have had enough. ftc they're out for revenge. nasane mashiri, al jazeera, bangui. >> the majority of the crircht nation overthrown by muslim rebels. the clock is ticking once again for congress for lawmakers, it is the final week of the year. both houses in washington at the same time both houses facing a laundry list of items to be voted on. the biggest is of course the budget. to avoid a shutdown like happened in october. libby casey, what happens if congress doesn't meet its end of the year deadline? >> the first deadline we're coming up really fast friday, december the 13th. this is when 29 members of the house and senate a budget conference committee to put out their proposal on how to keep this government running and funded. paul ryan chairman of the house and patty murray, one republican one democrat engaging in talks, don't expect them to come up with a big proposal but a modest proposal could keep the government funded and running past the next deadline we're watching, january 15th. t
FOX News
Dec 9, 2013 11:00am PST
johnson is talking about today, although a democrat, ezekiel emanuel, one of the architects of the law insists the more people learn about the benefits, the more they'll like it. take a listen. >> in wisconsin, a young man, 27 years old, his -- on average his insurance costs will increase by 124%. from $1,100 a year to over $2,400 per year. that's because of obama care. >> no one has launched a big pr campaign to get these people signed up because of the problems with the federal website. we are about to launch a big pr campaign. and that, i think, is going to persuade a lot of people. >> now, as part of that pr campaign, as mr. emanuel calls it, today the white house is trying to tout the fact that medicaid is being expanded all around the country to get millions of people who don't have insurance right now covered. of course, that means taxpayers kicking in the money to cover these folks. the question is going to be whether or not the math adds up in the end. whether you can get enough young, healthy people to sign up for the law in order to help pay for all these millions of folks c
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00am EST
cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the nonthreatening is what i'm concerned about. we will offer our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments and then we will move to questions around the table. thank you for doing this. >> first of all i just want to say thank you for all of you for being here. and thank you for letting me engage in t
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
a racial i.d. card, so you would know which laws applied to you and what you were allowed to do. but as of 1952, every black person in the country over the age of 16 had to have not just a ratio i.d. car, like everyone else, but also this passbook, which any white person could demand to see at any time. and if you were found to be in a place that was not just reserved for black people, if your passbook did not explain what you had explicit permission to be there, as a nonwhite person, then it was illegal for you to be there. and you could be arrested, just for existing. just not having your passbook on you at all times was also grounds to be arrested and thrown in jail. the pass laws meant that by virtue of being black in south africa, you were presumed to be a criminal unless you could prove otherwise by having the proper paperwork. and any white person could challenge you anywhere for any reason, and if you did not have the passbook, if you did not have the right documents, if you didn't have the right written permission to be where you were, when you were there, then you coul
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 10:00am EST
of thansik shinawatra. the prime minister that they were trying to force out was the brother-in-law of the shinawatra. delivering another firing speech in front of the protesters. >> today we have done the best in thailand. this will enable us to change thailand and reform thailand for the future of the country. but apart from house dissolution nothing has changed. the protesters look like they're settling in for another long fight, although this was supposed to be the final day. al jazeera, bangkok. >> a difficult choice. a group in somalia choose between rebel fighters and letting families go hungry. >>> change is demanded in washington. >> and announcements later in the program. first in egypt more than 50 students have been arrested after a violent protest at universities in cairo. opportunities were demonstrating in support of the post president mohammed morsi and several police cars were set on fire. students have been demonstrat dg for months now and they're calling for the release of dozens of students who have been arrested and held without charges. protests escalated after
MSNBC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
people. they came up, dare i say it, with health care exchanges which president obama put into law. they came up with revenue sharing to help stress state and local government. they're turning their own back on their own history. not just on liberal ideas. >> you know, congressman, a lot of people -- this was brought home when they realize you're talking about children. there was as i said this very arresting article in "the new york times" this morning front page that i read very early this morning. about this 11-year-old named sesani. and it brought to mind when the president was speaking on income inequality. he talked about children in poverty. listen. >> the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own. that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. >> i mean, when we get to the point where children in no fault of their own are living in these situations and it's just discarded, that's troubling about the spiri
CBS
Dec 7, 2013 6:00pm PST
. it was a brutal, racist system that in 1948 was made the law of the land. >> the laws were unjust laws, and they did not oblige obedience. >> teichner: archbishop desmond tutu remembers how it began, as mandela rose in the ranks of leadership of a civil rights group called the african national congress, the a.n.c. >> they were the revolutionaries of their day. they were the wild young men. >> teichner: former "time" magazine editor rick stengel spent countless hours in private conversation with mandela while collaborating on mandela's autobiography. >> mandela went to johannesburg as a young man and was treated in the terrible way that young black men were treated in the 1950s. i think this had a huge effect on him. >> teichner: mandela was in the forefront of growing resistance by the a.n.c., which began to protest the hated laws requiring blacks to carry passes, restricting where they could go. then, a galvanizing moment caught the world's attention. on march 21, 1960, in sharpeville, the peaceful civil rights movement was pierced with bullets. ( gunfire ) walter cronkite reported. >
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 6:30pm PST
the standard of banking laws. >> with the completion of the vocal rule, resolution authority, stronger capital, the tools of financial reform are being used to make the financial system safer and hold financial institutions responsible for baring their risk. >> lieu heads to australia in february for a meeting. >>> jp morgan chase is warning nearly half a million holders of prepaid cash cards that their personal information may have been accessed by hackers. the cards were issued by several corporations to pay employees and by some government agency s issuing tax refunds and unemployment benefits. >>> still ahead, will twitter's big plan to make more money pay off for shareholders, or will this add strategy potentially backfire? >>> the biggest decliner in the dow today, microsoft. invest tors dumped shares on hearing that alan the ceo of ford may not take the wheel. there is intense speculation he will step into the job after the contract at ford ends in 2014. here is how he answered to phil lebeau about taking the top job. >> i'm honored to serve ford and we have no change in the plan. >> re
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 7:30pm PST
a five-year low, the affordable care act may be turning the corner. >> this law is working and will future.o the gwen: is it all too good to be true? >> while the white house wants to claim that healthcare.gov is now working, we know that obamacare is still plagued with problems. gwen: outside washington, detroit is headed into bankruptcy, pensions are disappearing and low wage workers say they're being left out. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country. gwen: and -- we remember nelson mandela. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. gwen: covering the week, jackie calmes of the "new york times," michael fletcher of "the washington post," and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live, from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- we know inw-up, cyber world, threats are always evolving. we were protecting networks, then we were protecting the tra
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm PST
it erased from south african law, he continued to fight apartness because although the apartheid law was gone, apartness remained in south africa. black and white continued to live mostly apart. if the 20th century had an indispensable man, it was nelson mandela. and south africans knew that, which is why they stood in line for so long when they were offered a chance to vote for him for president. he was, as south african president jacob zuma put it today, the country's greatest son. >> this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost his greatest son. >> shortly after the news of nelson mandela's death reached the white house, president obama said this. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they are guided by their hopes and not by their fears. we will not like
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
's the guy. >> reporter: he becomes mandela's mentor and encourages him to earn a law degree. he also introduces mandela to his young cousin, evelyn masi. the two marry in 1946 and welcomed their first child, a son, that same year. their family will eventually grow to include another son and a daughter. another daughter had been born in 1947 but died within a year. racism and segregation had existed in south africa for as long as there had been white settlers, the majority of them were descendants of the dutch and call themselves afrikaners. in 1948 the national party sweeps boo powers and codifies those apartheid policies into law. >> they were trying to achieve this kind of ethnic fragmentation of the country here in order to give the afrikaner nation its own homeland. >> reporter: the anc seeks to counter the new nationalist government. in 1952, the anc embarks on the defiance campaign, an ambitious campaign to mobilize their countrymen to defy unjust apartheid laws. mandela is put in charge of organizing the mol unveers. >> and we volunteers to go to prison. to be arrested and not
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 1:00pm PST
. they want the law to mail and they would start bankrupting insurance companies because they break the model. >> the insurance companies may be bankrupt even further. this is deeply cynical. the website works and let's go back to the argument. we are making in the first place. guess what happened if you don't get the young people. not like the exchanges go away. they become a lot more expensive. they won't wind up killing them, they will wound them and guess who will be stuck with the tab. the taxpayer. with the republicans and conservatives are doing is expanding the government. this is big government conservatism. >> it's ironic because the first part is they don't need and don't want, but the argument is that you don't need health insurance seems to be the weakest part of the argument. maybe somebody who is 18 doesn't think they need it, but somebody who is 26 or 25 or getting to the end of that state on your parent, they are starting to get to the age where they think i do need this. >> yes. starting to mature. starting to realize that maybe this invincible thing is what it's cracked up
FOX News
Dec 9, 2013 8:00am PST
the media. it is nearly a year since the deadly shooting at sandy hook elementary school and law enforcement officials and officials from the town are getting ahead of what will come. there is no public remembrance they say. they are asking media to stay clear of the town that suffered so freightly on december 14th last year. 20 young children and six educators were murdered that day on december 14th, 2012. this saturday, marks a year since that horrific event. as you can see the news conference is beginning. we'll monitor what the officials have to say and bring you any headlines moments from now. today's top headlines and brand new stories you will sear here first. jon: the obamacare website gets a makeover. new options are able if you're shopping. with deadline looming do the updates matter? >>> wild weekend weather across the u.s. and more is on the way. meteorologist maria molina on where people should be preparing now. >>> silicon valley versus washington. the nation's top tech companies teaming up to send a message to uncle sam. ease up on all snooping. it is all "happening now." jon:
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
would know what laws applied to you. but as of 1952, every black person over the age of 16 had to have not only a racial id card but also this passbook which any white person could demand to see at any time. and if you were found to be in a place just reserved for black people, then it was illegal for you to be there and you could be arrested just for existing, just not having your passbook on you taught was also grounds to be arrested and thrown in jail. the pass laws meant that by virtue of being black in south africa, you were presumed to be a criminal unless you could prove otherwise by having the proper paperwork. and any white person could challenge you anywhere for any reason, and if you did not have the passport, if you did not have the right documents, if you did not have the right written permission to be where you were when you were there, then you could be put in jail. passbook laws had been around since the 18th century, and the structure was always the same. white people never needed them. white people could go wherever they needed. but non-white people need add internal
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 6:00pm EST
widespread outrage. this comes after a new law banning protests without government permission. we have been following this crackdown for time magazine. we are joined from cairo via skype. thanks for being with us today. >> thank you. >> with these women released with, do you accepts a shift in the government? do you think they may be softening their stance a little? >> it's important to make a distinction here. a lot of it depends on the prerogative of the individual judge in this case and what we saw here is that the judge iníñ the initial case handed down a set of sentences that were particularly harsh, and that caused the public's imagination, and that, i think, caused significant shift in public opinion, which weighed on the government and i think probably weighed on this judge's mind when he was making this second ruling, but yes, it is important to stress that this is coming into can text of a broader clamp down on political protests in the street and the same week that those sentences were handed down, the military-led government implemented a law that prohibits all public protests
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because you and i know with all other type of data. you are a social an throw polks when you were being vetted and doing your review of data. you got down to the line item. if there was something personal you do a nonidentifier number. you strip the personal data and put them up on websites where it's a egalitarian. if a c
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00am EST
thing is we are not following our laws anymore. call.thank you for the this is another tweeter saying -- bloomberg news has this story based on the economic power of the u.s. and the power viewed around the world. simon kennedy writes -- when the u.s. grew at a healthy pace, its citizens were buyers, fueling demands for the goods in china and other nations. the cap the world's economy humming. it may not work that way anymore . a rebounding u.s. is giving less support for you -- for global growth than it has in the past. the smallest u.s. current account deficits since 1999 shows the trend and the discovery of new domestic sources of oil and gas, it reinforces this issue. the country is spending less on imported energy." you can read the full story on bloomberg's website. the front page of "the pittsburgh post-gazette" -- a look at some of the victims from one year ago and a story that will likely get a lot of attention in the week ahead. this is from "the detroit free press" -- you can get more information by logging on to freep.com. next is robert from massachusetts. decline andre i
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 4:00pm EST
bills, but trying to defund the health care law would be more productive. host: thank you for joining us this morning. guest: thank you for having me. >> on update on the defense bill. then the house meets at 5:00. on the agenda, requiring a study of state child abuse penalties. >> i got upset with the they coveredause my mental health work the first few meetings i had, and then they never showed up anymore, and one day i was walking in the downstairs floor in the white house and met this woman who was one of the press people. nobody ever covers my meeting. she said, is not just a sexy issue. we toured the country, found out what was needed, developed legislation, and past the mental health assistance act of 1980 -- healththe mental assistance act of 1980, and it passed to congress. one of the greatest disappointments of my life, it was never implemented. first lady rosalynn carter tonight at 9:00 eastern, also on c-span radio and www.c-span.org. the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff is pressing congress to act this year on defense policy bill. dempsey wrotee -- to house and senate l
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 9:00am PST
free. it's not acceptable. not in a country that supposedly ruled by law but what the stirrups and the most is the behavior of the former deputy prime minister if his troops about who is leading the protests singtel said an unelected people's comes so cute to see the next prime minister after the current administration is ousted. from our house a sneaking suspicion that some are using the demonstrations as a way to seize power. i got were nine demonstrating to know someone who didn't work that the people under the former administration to take over. we're fighting to put politics back in the hands of the people i sae ramos is starting to have doubts that the lesson battles between pro and anti government groups would you very much me time and into a better country. so when someone enters the world in bangkok. that will wrap up our sleeves and i actually have someone in bangkok. i knew. violence continues in the central african republic fierce fighting between rival forces has reportedly left at least one hundred people dead armed militants attacked three muslim controlled locat
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 5:00am PST
years in prison. he worked with then president f.b. daclerc to abolish all apartheid laws. they shared the nobel peace prize in 1983. the next year, mandela became south africa's first black president. >> i cherish the idea of a new south africa, where all south africans are equal. >> reporter: he worked for reconciliation between whites and blacks and oversaw the creation of a constitution that enshrined racial equality. he retired from active pop ticks in 1989 but continues to mediate in conflicts in other countries in africa. news of mandela's death quickly spread around the world. delegates to the u.n. security council adjourned their meeting and observed a moment of silence. >> many around the world were greatly influenced by his selfless struggle for human dignity, equality and freedom. >> reporter: political leaders came, one after another, to speak about what mandela meant to the world. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> translator: he achieved a major success in building t
LINKTV
Dec 7, 2013 6:00am PST
of a u.n. mission to restore law and order in a country torn apart by interreligious violence. almost half a million people have fled their home in fear. people are finding refuge wherever they can. >> thousands of christians have sought refuge just outside the capital. they say muslim militants attacked their homes. >> we fled our homes in fear of more attacks from muslim militias. they came to our area in search of anti-muslims, and then they started shooting people. >> after months of violence, they voted to send troops to the african republic to restore law and order. the peacekeeping mission has set up headquarters inside the airport. this is france's second peacekeeping mission in africa this year. back in january, the french government sent thousands of soldiers to mali to stamp out a military insurgency there. at an african summit in paris on friday, french president hollywood hollywood hollywood said in the future he wants africa to look after its own ecurity. they will discuss the arrival of interpret troops, which has calmed fighting for the time being. >> the draw has been
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 3:00pm PST
in the district, we've made some modifications through a comprehensive committee that include law enforcement, representative from the juvenile justice system, the courts and we recognize there's a huge issue here that we need to address. there's been a -- >> okay. let me quickly get way in, kenneth, the concept of zero tolerance was clearly created for a reason. has it gone in the wrong direction? what changed in education that we really needed this? >> what a didn't hear an answer to is what is zero tolerance. my question having worked in school for 30 plus years is what is zero tolerance? is that a 50% tolerance or 25% tolerance or is that what we're going to? i agree there are concerns about suspensions, puexpulsions and arrests. i'm not an advocate of this, there are disproportionate implications as well. my concern is out on the front lines in the school, what does that equate to. what is a minor misdemeanor that we're now going to handcuff school police officers and tell them they're not allowed to apply the law. if my child is assaulted in school, are they not allowed to follow the la
FOX News
Dec 8, 2013 3:00pm PST
. plus, with the website working better and enrollment on the rise, we'll ask one of the law's architects where obama care goes from here. and it's been ten years since i took over the anchor chair here. it's been quite a ride. we'll look back at some of our favorite moments from the last ten years. all right now on fox news sunday. and hello again from fox news in washington. this is a national day of prayer and reflection in south africa. as that nation continues to mourn the man many consideits father. south africans gathereded at makeshift shrines who died thursday at the age of 95. gregg is live outside mandela's home in johannesburg with the latest. >> chris, which was supposed to be that national day of prayer and reflection and in fact, at churches and synagogues across the country were filled with people marking the day, but here in what was the home neighborhood of nelson mandela, the mood here is anything but solemn. in fact, it is festive. take a look at what we saw, what we heard. they chanteded, blacks, whites and all races. young and old. it seems important for all to be as
CBS
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am PST
today, the senate will debate whether to extend a law regulating plastic firearms before it expires tomorrow. the law mandates every plastic gun have a piece of metal attached to it so metal detectors and x-rays can spot a weapon. gun control advocates want an extension for another decade. they say the law has added importance because of the availability of these 3d printers. >>> cars, flowers and a whole lot of fans. and the market just opened t take a quic why this tribute to actor paul walker drew thousands of o people. >>> and the market opened 10 minutes ago. let's get a quick look at the early numbers. not too bad. we'll get an update from our financial reporter, jason brooks the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine for challenge butter. and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life. avo: thesales event "sis back. drive which mea
KRON
Dec 8, 2013 8:00am PST
'm serious about it. >> okay. >> i don't see -- he was driving illegally and it is my fault. >> state law prohibits people from driving in the lane and no matter who you put the lane on the low is the law. >> thank you for bringing this to our attention. >>> we are back. if you are looking to see a movie there is a movie about family and justice. what is at the movies and what is showing in now showing. >> reporter: and around two broth merse a depressed town in america's rust belt. one of the brothers gets home from serving in iraq and lured into a ring and disappears. >> it is tough. makes me want to jump in there with you. >> see who walks out. >> when the police give up on the case it is up to his older brother to help him. out of the furnace with christian bale and forest whitaker. for now showing. >>> here is a strange story a trip from louisiana to california took a strange turn during a connecting flight in houston. a man says that he fell asleep on the plane that was filled with passengers when he woke up he was inside the plane all alone and locked inside. he was traveling on a
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
into royalty, grew up poor, he was the first black man to open a law firm in south africa. he was a well educated, sophisticated man. he knew white south africa, black south africa, poor south africa, wealthy south africa. one of his supporters said at the time when they were looking for a leader for this mass movement, in walks this six foot two inch massive demand. they said, yup, he is the one. mandela said at one of his first meetings, he stood in the room with the elders and said, i will be the first black president of south africa. he said that in the 1950s. >> and in south africa in recent line, what it was like to up in 1994, that first election. they still had tears in their eyes, still very vivid to them. legacy ofd that the nelson mandela would not be enough, that there was still a lot of work to be done in south africa. the country has problems. it is one of the leading places of rape in the country, aids is rampant. unemployment between the ages of 20 and 50 is more than 50%. but nelson mandela set the stage for the future. of them,t out the best this kind and gentle man. he
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
the age of eight, my grandfather was trained in passive resistence. that you go, break these unjust laws, and go to jail. and you remember, if you saw the movie gandhi, and you know from the history, these people would go and break the law. and they would go inside and get arrested and go to jail. and nelson mandela carried that movement and into the black independent movement. they weren't distinct at the time, these were all about freedom. if you weren't white you weren't getting freedoms. and in the end my family had to leave because they had been involved in the antiapartheid. >> what years in. >> my family left in 1961, their business was destroyed, bulldozed by the government, because they had been involved in the financing of apartheid.nd they left butt back, we went back in the 90's, and they are south african citizens and have watched this country build. and the ambassador was right, this country was going to have problems any way. all of the money, all of the education, all of the business opportunity went to a very very small minority, and if you want to equal that out, it is
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
is take a look for yourself. the truth is that most college-aged students because of the law can stay on their parents' plan and they may be the best deal for them. we've already insured about 3 million people. and your first job where you don't have full health insurance benefits may mean that you stay on your parents' plan a little bit longer, but at some point let's say when you turn 26, if you're between jobs or you have a passion wanting to start a business and you're not going to have health insurance, this gives you the opportunity to get high quality health insurance and for most people under 30, it's probably going to cost you less than your cell phone bill or your cable bill. less than 100 bucks. and there was a time when i looked healthy like these folks and thought i was never going to get sick. but what you discover is that some tough stuff happens. you have a run of bad luck. you suddenly need hospitalization. you have an accident. you get an illness. and for young people to realize it's in their health interest to get ongoing preventive care, to be able to get free cont
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm PST
-aged students, because of the law, can stay on their parents' plan and that may be the best deal for them and we've already insured three million people. and your first job where you don't have full health insurance benefits may mean that you stay on your parents' plan a little bit longer. but at some point, let's say when you turn 26, if you're between jobs or you've got a passion, you're wanting to start a business and you're not going to have health insurance, this gives you the opportunity to get high-quality health insurance and for most people under 30, it's probably going to cost you less than your cell phone bill or your cable bill. less than 100 bucks. and, you know, there was a time when i looked healthy like these folks and thought i was never going to get sick. but what you discover is that some tough stuff happens. you have a run of bad luck. you suddenly need hospitalization, you have an accident, you get an illness. and for young people to recognize that it is in their financial interests and their health interests to be able to get ongoing preventive care, to be able to get free
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
-span. treasury secretary jacob lew gave update on the dodd-frank regulation law. speaking at an event hosted by the pew charitable trust, secretary said the obama administration would press for more comprehensive global financial regulation in up coming g20 summit in australia. >> good morning everyone and thank you so much for joining us for this very special event. little housekeeping before i get started. please once secretary lew finish his remarks, stay seated. @&c"pe hosting this 76th secretary of the united states treasury jack lew. it has become a major influential voice on many of the toughest issues confronting society today. throughout 65 year history, pew has remain faithful to the guiding principle. tell the truth, and trust the people. be it healthcare, be it environment, economic mobility, pew has spoken truth to power to improve the lives of millions of people throughout the world. of course almost two years ago, pew along with the c.f.a. institute cofounded the council. which sought to give voice to the people's interest. i'm particularly pleased secretary lew will be speaki
FOX News
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am PST
's do thing in the design of the law that necessarily limit the number of providers and number of doctors you will have access to. that necessarily means the president was absolutely lying when he said if you like your doctor you can keep your doctor. bill: full-throated defense, karl. people aren't stupid. wallace said the president guaranteed me i could keep my doctor. emanuel said, if you want to, you can pay for it. >> exactly. you can have anything you want as you come up with the jack for it. look, this is why i'm amazed, first of all they try to defend it. the president stepped back from saying if you like your health care plan you can keep it and apologized. i think that apology was blanket enough it cover this is as well. why emanuel continues to try to defend it saying well the president didn't promise you couldn't have unlimited, blah, blah, blah. it was ridiculous defense, not particularly effective. bill: on the political side of this, you said this before. you believe democrats hope that the american voter forgets. >> yeah. but they aren't. they're not going to. l
FOX News
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am PST
the work force earlier? >> i think it's starting right now. for example, law schools are reducing sizes of classes and several prominent business schools did not raise enough applications last year to start a first year class. for example, george mason university did not have a first year class here in virginia. and, you know, i know my program, my part-time program, which is our bread and butter, our enrollment is down. you've got to deliver jobs and value in the end. i don't think that's happening. >> that's smart. every time unemployment numbers come out, smart economists say, wait a second. the real measure here is work force participation. what percentage of american whose can work, who want to work, are working? why isn't that the number the government releases and that we use as our common currency of this conversation? >> it does release it, right alongside the unemployment numbers but the press is just interested in the unemployment number because it's a sexy number, one we've used over tile. like the headline number for the cpi or the core number for the cpi and people are awa
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
dalibhunga, which means trouble maker, he lived up to his name. after studying law he dedicated himself to apartheid. a system imposed on the black african. nelson mandela was arrested in sentenced to life in prison. he spent 28 years behind bars, mostly in a tiny cell on robin island near cape town. nelson mandela's brutal imprisonment led to tuberculosis and damaged eye sight. his fame grew and the world clamoured for the release of a man the symbol of the civil rights movement. finally he walked out of prison. four years later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> te
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
. >> he is a very aggressive and intelligent and cerebral law enforcement enforcer. >> do you think he will to indown stototonedown stop and . >> i think so. he is the most talented law enforcer in the business. >> we should address that he served as police commissioner in la and new york city for the past 20 years and he was tremendously successful in both places. he pioneered and pushed forward the broken windows theory and he penaltwent after the little crid all of the little things that created a sense of disorder. and he created the comp stat program which used computer models and stats-for-high crime areas. how dramatic of effect has he had across the country. >> his programs have been implemented in baltimore and los angeles and you have gary mccarthy who has learned braton's ways and implemented them in cities like chicago the other thing about the commissioner, he has been sought after efe everywhere. he speaks and lectures everywhere he goes. he is an intel genlt intelligenl reread individual. he is going to continue to have a impact on law enforcement. >> the reaction has b
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